Egg Decorating In An Artists’ Home

Easter Eggs

Happy Resurrection Day from Loveland! I’m going to put up this quick little post on behalf of my hubby, Scott Freeman, because he wanted to share our egg decorating tradition with the world this year. Decorating Easter eggs is something we have done since we were both in art school, way back in the 1980s. We blow out the insides of the eggs, through tiny holes, and decorate the shells. We’ve been saving them for all these years, though plenty have broken by now.

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Easter Eggs

Rooster egg by Scott

It seems Easter eggs are somewhat out of favor with some branches of Christian believers these days. There are notions about eggs and rabbits linked with false “gods” and such. Scott and I have made a careful study of these topics in past years. We did this partly out of curiosity, and because we just like to know stuff. We also did it because we both have a deep interest in being close to God, and living in a way that pleases Him, as much as we can. We feel that the main way to do this is to love Him and people. However, as artists, we sincerely wish to use our gifts to honor the God for whom we profess to live. Would you like to know what we found out?

Easter Eggs

A couple of eggs I painted

"Jonah" egg, by Scott

“Jonah” egg, by Scott

Easter Eggs

Humpty Dumpty and Cat eggs, by Scott

The most important conclusions we discovered are elaborated in this post (click here) from Scott’s blog, “Art And Life Notes,” which is also a WordPress blog. Suffice it to say that there is ample evidence to conclude that eggs are a part of the holiday not because of any link to any “god” at all, really. It is likely that there were simply an abundance of them to be eaten on Easter, for reasons which I do not fully recall. Some theorize that folks were not eating eggs during the season of Lent, so the eggs piled up. In any case, there is really not a shred of evidence that the traditional use of eggs was about pagan fertility, unless you count a lot of Christians saying that it’s “obvious.”

pug egg, by Scott

pug egg, by Scott

In the meantime, we continue to decorate eggs, and to enjoy doing so. I have posted several photos Scott used in his Facebook post, so you can take a look. If you are into egg decorating, Scott and I would love to see what you’ve been up to, too!

RePurposing For Christmas Ornaments

Knowing my affection for old dolls, my hubby repaired and repurposed this itty-bitty one for me.

Knowing my affection for old dolls, my hubby repaired and repurposed this itty-bitty one for me.

Our German exchange student, Klara, was with us a few years ago for the holiday season, and she was astounded at American decorations. I don’t think the word “tacky” was in her vocabulary, yet I had the distinct impression that this was her opinion of many of the outdoor decorations in our neighborhood. She would roll her eyes at the large, inflated Santas, Grinches, snowmen, and all of the other silly blow-up versions of Christmas characters. I have to say, I pretty much share her sentiment. But she was no grinch, nor am I.

I made these ornaments back in the 1970's, from school glue and yarn. They don't look great at all unless placed in front of a light. That changes everything.

I made these ornaments back in the 1970’s, from school glue and yarn. They don’t look great at all unless placed in front of a light. That changes everything.

Old newspapers, flour, water & paint became a Nativity set made by my husband.

Old newspapers, flour, water & paint became a Nativity set made by my husband.

In Germany, we saw all sorts of tiny wooden ornaments at the homes of Klara’s grandparents and other people we visited. Some of the things they showed us were traditional figures, and quite old. There’s so much I appreciate about well-crafted holiday decorations, and I suppose I’m a bit nostalgic about some of the not-so-well-crafted items I grew up with – plastic elves with glued-on “realistic” beards, candy-cane striped styrofoam balls set in plastic holly wreaths, and sparkly gold-glitter ribbons. Something really appeals to me in these old decorations, so, clearly I am not exempt from falling for “tacky” ornaments and such.

Tiny clay dancer/bell I made for my ballerina daughter

Tiny clay dancer/bell I made for my ballerina daughter

For this post, I wanted to show you some of the Christmas ornaments that have become my favorites over the years. Scott and I have quite a large collection. In fact, we have so many ornaments that we always have to leave many of them packed because even if we get a pretty large tree, there’s just not room for them all. Most of our hand-made ornaments are re-purposed materials.

A gift for our animal-loving daughter, an old glass ball in a perch for a clay chinchilla (made by Scott Freeman)

A gift for our animal-loving daughter, an old glass ball is now a perch for a clay chinchilla (made by Scott Freeman)

We also display our old stuff differently, year to year. Some antique glass balls and lights may go into a clear glass vase on a shelf; flocked poinsettias may end up on the tree instead of in an arrangement. Some of the really fragile tree ornaments find a new home in the China cabinet. I’m no decorating queen, but I get help from my family members, and it usually turns out nicely.

Small bottles, beads, and hardware are turned into funky angels.

Small bottles, beads, and hardware are turned into funky angels.

Bits of fabric become tiny canvases for painted ornaments.

Bits of fabric become tiny canvases for painted ornaments, which I made for my family.

I enjoy taking a walk through Christmas past via all of these old treasures. I don’t think I’ll ever have need of an inflatable Santa.